The Foehn Wind

On Saturday 16 October 2010, many parts of New Zealand, especially South Island, experienced Foehn winds. During the approach to summer, eastern parts of both islands will get more warm Foehn winds under suitable conditions. In this blog post I'll describe what the Foehn wind is and explain how it comes about. We'll start by looking at temperature reports from weather stations on Saturday 16 Oct 2010.  

Charles Kingsford Smith

A recent visit to Sydney International Airport has inspired me to write a little about another famous aviator with a New Zealand connection. Last year I wrote a post about Jean Batten who, in her youth had met the topic of this post, Charles Kingsford Smith. Auckland International Airport is named in honour of Jean Batten and likewise Sydney International Airport is named after Charles Kingsford Smith.  

Spectacular contrail outbreak over Wellington

Written by Ross Marsden, Meteorologist

On the afternoon of Monday 19 July 2010, a neat set of four persistent contrails moved across the Cook Strait area.  NASA's  MODIS Rapid Response System captured the contrails in the image stream from the Aqua space craft which was over Wellington at about 2:20 pm. You can see the image on the MODIS web site here:  http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/subsets/?subset=NewZealand.2010200.aqua.1km  Here’s part of the MODIS image.

 

Layers and streets of cloud

Clouds come in many different types and are characterised and named according to both their shape and height in the atmosphere.  While a single snapshot in time at a given location may only contain one type of cloud, there are many days when multiple cloud types can be observed in the sky at once. The satellite images below is a nice example of different cloud types sitting at different levels above Waikato. Here's what the satellite image looked like Saturday afternoon 3 July 2010, for southwestern parts of Waikato near Kawhia Harbour: