Forecast for Christchurch city: 12:30pm Thu-24-Feb

Summary: Thursday to Monday
Apart from a period of rain during Friday, dry weather through to the end of Sunday. No strong winds expected. Cool nights.

Thursday
Fine weather; high cloud increasing from late afternoon. Northeasterlies, freshening for a time this afternoon, especially about coastal suburbs.

Afternoon maximum temperature around 22 C. Thursday night, temperature falling to around 16 C.

Forecast for Christchurch city: 7:05am Thu-24-Feb

Summary: Thursday to Sunday
Apart from showers on Friday, dry weather expected through to the end of Sunday. No strong winds expected. Cool nights.

Thursday
Fine weather, after the clearance of morning fog patches (fog gone by 8:00am). Northeasterlies, freshening for a time in the afternoon especially about coastal suburbs.

Afternoon maximum temperature around 22 C. Thursday night, temperature falling to around 11 C.

Forecast for Christchurch city: 12:05pm Wed-23-Feb

Summary: Wednesday to Saturday
Mostly dry through to the end of Thursday and again on Saturday; cold showery weather Friday morning. No strong winds expected. Cool nights.

Wednesday
Cloudy. A few showers west of the central city, clearing around the middle of the day. Light or moderate southwesterly turning to a moderate northeasterly in the afternoon.

Afternoon maximum temperature around 18 C. Tonight, temperature falling to around 11 C.

Tropical cyclones: extra-tropical transition

On average, about nine tropical cyclones form in the South Pacific tropics between November and April. Three or four of these leave the tropics and nearly all of them undergo a marked transformation to a mid-latitude cyclone – a completely different weather system – before they reach New Zealand. For a while after this extra-tropical transition, the system may be referred to as “cyclone so-and-so” (i.e. dropping the word "tropical").

Myth-busting Windburn

This post was written by Wayde Beckman from the Health Sponsorship Council.

“I got windburnt today.”  “My lips feel windburnt.”  It’s something we hear from time to time (and even say ourselves) to explain red, sore, dry skin or lips after being outside.  And in this glorious country of ours, it’s hard to be outside and not feel the sweet caress (or fierce pummeling) of the wind.  But what is windburn?  And can the wind really burn our skin?