Why it Was So Dry in February 2013

During the summer of 2012-2013, anticyclones dominated the New Zealand area. Many places had little or no rainfall since early February.

The map below shows the average mean sea level pressure over the New Zealand area over Jan/Feb 2013. There's no doubt about the pressure being high and not changing very much. Because this map shows averaged pressures, we don't see the few troughs that passed across Aotearoa New Zealand during that time.

The Bomb

It's been a while since a rapidly-deepening low passed close to, or over, New Zealand. I thought it might be interesting to take a quick look at why the "bomb" low of Saturday 03 March 2012 deepened so quickly and why the winds around it affected the areas they did. First of all, here is a series of weather maps covering the period 1pm Friday 02 March to 1am Sunday 04 March.

A Winter Storm

In the days following Wednesday 6 July 2011, stormy westerly conditions affected New Zealand. In this blog, we'll look at why.

The "Long Waves"

Below is the mean sea level analysis - the weather map - for 6am Sunday 10 July. In between big highs over the mid South Pacific and south of western Australia is a really large trough; it's the area shaded light blue. The weather map looked like this, more or less, since Wednesday 6 July: that is, the big features on it aren't moving much.