Cyclone Victor Update 25 Jan 2016

By MetService Meteorologist Ciaran Doolin

Note: all times listed below are New Zealand local time

History

Tropical Cyclone Victor (TC Victor) was named by RSMC Nadi on Friday 15 January, located near the Northern Cook Islands.  Since then, the cyclone tracked between Niue and the Southern Cook Islands, then turned west and headed past Tonga before finally heading southwest towards New Zealand.

Cyclone Victor Update 24 Jan 2016

By MetService Meteorologist Ciaran Doolin

Note: all times listed below are New Zealand local time

History

Tropical Cyclone Victor (TC Victor) was named by RSMC Nadi on Friday 15 January, located near the Northern Cook Islands.  Since then, the cyclone tracked between Niue and the Southern Cook Islands, then turned west and headed past Tonga before finally heading southwest towards New Zealand.

At 1 am Saturday 23 January TC Victor was reclassified by RSMC Nadi as a Tropical Low.

Tropical Cyclone Victor reclassified

By MetService Meteorologist Ciaran Doolin

Please note: all times listed below are New Zealand local time

History

Tropical Cyclone Victor (TC Victor) was named by RSMC Nadi on January 15th, located near the Northern Cook Islands.  Since then, the cyclone has tracked between Niue and the Southern Cook Islands, before turning west and heading past Tonga.

Tropical Cyclone Victor

By MetService Meteorologist Lisa Murray

Please note: all times listed below are New Zealand local time

History

Tropical Cyclone Victor (TC Victor) was named by RSMC Nadi on January 15th, located near the Northern Cook Islands.  Since then, the cyclone has tracked between Niue and the Southern Cook Islands, before turning west and heading towards Tonga.

Weather balloons

Weather balloons have been released for decades around New Zealand to record data throughout the lower layers of the atmosphere. They have been used to measure everything from the base of low cloud to atmospheric wind and temperature profiles. One of the first people to use weather balloons was French Meteorologist Léon Teisserenc de Bort. He released hundreds of weather balloons from his observatory in Trappes, France. His experiments lead to the discovery of the tropopause and the stratosphere.